Call for Abstract

8th Global Cardiologists and Echocardiography Annual Meeting, will be organized around the theme “Advancements In the field of Echocardiography”

Echocardiography 2016 is comprised of 19 tracks and 101 sessions designed to offer comprehensive sessions that address current issues in Echocardiography 2016.

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks. All related abstracts are accepted.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a test that produces pictures of the heart. TEE uses high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to make detailed pictures of your heart and the arteries that lead to and from it. Unlike a standard echocardiogram, the echo transducer that produces the sound waves for TEE is attached to a thin tube that passes through the mouth, down through the throat and into the esophagus. Because the esophagus is so close to the upper chambers of the heart, very clear images of those heart structures and valves can be obtained.

  • Track 1-1Fundamentals of Perioperative Transesophageal Echocardiography
  • Track 1-2Aortic valve disease
  • Track 1-3TEE and ischemic heart disease
  • Track 1-4Diseases of the thoracic aorta
  • Track 1-5Transthoracic Echocardiography

3D echocardiography (also known as 4D echocardiography when the picture is moving) is now possible, using a matrix array ultrasound probe and an appropriate processing system. This enables detailed anatomical assessment of cardiac pathology, particularly valvular defects, and cardiomyopathies. The ability to slice the virtual heart in infinite planes in an anatomically appropriate manner and to reconstruct three-dimensional images of anatomic structures make 3D echocardiography unique for the understanding of the congenitally malformed heart. Real Time 3-Dimensional echocardiography can be used to guide the location of bioptomes during right ventricular endomyocardial biopsies, placement of catheter delivered valvular devices, and in many other intraoperative assessments. The 3D Echo Box developed by the European Association of Echocardiography offers a complete review of Three Dimensional Echocardiography.

  • Track 2-1Clinical Application of three Dimensional Echo Cardiography
  • Track 2-2Three Dimensional Echo Cardiography in Congenital Heart Diseases
  • Track 2-3Three-dimensional echocardiographic techniques
  • Track 2-4Three-dimensional echocardiographic quantifying ventricular volumes

Fetal Echocardiography is typically performed by a specially trained ultrasound sonographer and the images are interpreted by a pediatric cardiologist who specializes in fetal congenital heart disease. Some maternal-fetal medicine specialists (perinatologist) also perform fetal echocardiograms. A limited evaluation of the fetal heart is possible during regular obstetric scanning and is appropriate for women at low risk. Women who have one of the risk factors during pregnancy should have a detailed fetal echocardiogram performed by a physician who is specially trained in fetal cardiac evaluation.

  • Track 3-1Assessment and management of fetal cardiac arrhythmias
  • Track 3-2Early fetal echocardiography
  • Track 3-32D measurement and rendering in fetal echocardiography
  • Track 3-4Supplementary views of the heart

Strain rate Imaging is a method in Echocardiography for measuring regional or global deformation of the myocardium. The term "deformation" refers to the myocardium changing shape and dimensions during the cardiac muscle. If there is myocardial Ischemia, or there has been a Myocardial infarction, in part of the heart muscle, this part is weakened and shows reduced and altered Systolic function. Also in regional asynchrony, as in Bundle branch block, there is regional heterogeneity of systolic function. By strain rate imaging, the simultaneous function of different regions can be displayed and measured.

  • Track 4-1Speckle tracking echocardiography
  • Track 4-2Global longitudinal strain echocardiography
  • Track 4-3Right ventricular strain echocardiography
  • Track 4-4Normal values strain echocardiography

Stress echocardiography is a test that uses ultrasound imaging to show how well the heart muscle is working to pump blood to the body. It is most often used to detect a decrease in blood flow to the heart from narrowing in the coronary arteries.

  • Track 5-1Strain and strain rate echocardiography
  • Track 5-2Strain stress echocardiography
  • Track 5-3Strain Rate Imaging
  • Track 5-4Myocardial Strain by Doppler Echocardiography

Contrast echocardiography, or Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is the addition of ultrasound contrast medium, or imaging agent, to traditional ultrasonography. The ultrasound contrast is made up of tiny microbubbles filled with a gas core and protein shell. This allows the microbubbles to circulate through the cardiovascular system and return the ultrasound waves creating a highly reflective image. The most commonly used types of ultrasound contrast are known as Definity (definityimaging.com) and Optison (optisonimaging.com). Both have been approved by the FDA. There are multiple applications in which contrast-enhanced ultrasound can be useful. The most commonly used application is in the enhancement of LV endocardial borders for assessment of global and regional systolic function. Contrast may also be used to enhance visualization of wall thickening during stress echocardiography, for the assessment of LV thrombus, or for the assessment of other masses in the heart. Contrast echocardiography has also been used to assess blood perfusion throughout myocardium in the case of coronary artery disease. The Contrast Echo Box developed by the European Association of Echocardiography, and the American Society of Echocardiography Contrast Zone both offer a complete review of Contrast Echocardiography.

Contrast echocardiography, or Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is the addition of ultrasound contrast medium, or imaging agent, to traditional ultrasonography. The ultrasound contrast is made up of tiny microbubbles filled with a gas core and protein shell. This allows the microbubbles to circulate through the cardiovascular system and return the ultrasound waves creating a highly reflective image. The most commonly used types of ultrasound contrast are known as Definity®(definityimaging.com) and Optison® (optisonimaging.com). Both have been approved by the FDA. There are multiple applications in which contrast-enhanced ultrasound can be useful. The most commonly used application is in the enhancement of LV endocardial borders for assessment of global and regional systolic function. Contrast may also be used to enhance visualization of wall thickening during stress echocardiography, for the assessment of LV thrombus, or for the assessment of other masses in the heart. Contrast echocardiography has also been used to assess blood perfusion throughout myocardium in the case of coronary artery disease. The Contrast Echo Box developed by the European Association of Echocardiography, and the American Society of Echocardiography Contrast Zone both offer a complete review of Contrast Echocardiography. - See more at: http://echocardiography.conferenceseries.com/#sthash.mYiGUDv7.dpuf
  • Track 6-1Contrast agents, safety and imaging technique
  • Track 6-2Contrast echocardiography physical principles
  • Track 6-3Microbubble Contrast agents
  • Track 6-4Myocardial contrast echocardiography
  • Track 6-5Applications of Contrast Cardiography

The division of Cardiovascular Imaging interprets cross sectional imaging studies of the heart and vascular system using Computed Tomography (CT or "CAT" scans) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with a volume of more than 2,500 studies each year. Both CT and MRI are non-invasive imaging modalities, meaning that no catheterization is required. MUSC operates the most up-to-date, cutting edge imaging equipment to ensure optimal diagnostic quality in patient care while also minimizing patient exposure to ionizing radiation.

  • Track 7-1Cardiovascualr Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Track 7-2Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging
  • Track 7-3Computed Tomography
  • Track 7-4Clinical Uses of Cardiac Imaging

The aortic valve is composed of three cusps: the left, right, and non-coronary cusps. The left cusp guards the left sinus of Valsalva, with the left main coronary artery arising superior to and midway between the commissures of this cusp. The right cusp guards the right sinus of Valsalva, with the right coronary artery arising superiorly. It is the most anterior cusp and is positioned immediately just posterior to the right ventricular outflow tract. Its most rightward commissure is adjacent to the septal attachment of the tricuspid valve. The noncoronary cusp is located posteromedially, guards the noncoronary sinus of Valsalva, and sits above the interatrial septum.

  • Track 8-1Echocardiography aortic stenosis
  • Track 8-2Aortic regurgitation echocardiography
  • Track 8-3Aortic dissection echocardiography
  • Track 8-4Echocardiography Aorta

Cardiologists are doctors who specialize in diagnosing and treating diseases or conditions of the heart and blood vessels—the cardiovascular system. You might also visit a cardiologist so you can learn about your risk factors for heart disease and find out what measures you can take for better heart health. Cardiologists provide the region's most advanced treatments, most of which are not available at any other hospital in the area. Cardiologists research in areas like heart rhythm disorders and heart failure is improving patient care around the world. Cardiologists give people hope for a healthier future by educating the best and brightest cardiologists of tomorrow.

  • Track 9-1Non-Invasive Cardiologist
  • Track 9-2Interventional Cardiologist
  • Track 9-3Adult Cardiology
  • Track 9-4Heart Cardiology

Cardiovascular technologists and technicians assist physicians in diagnosing and treating cardiac (heart) and peripheral vascular (blood vessel) ailments. Cardiovascular technicians who specialize in electrocardiograms (EKGs), stress testing and Holter monitors are known as cardiographic or EKG technicians.Technologists who use ultrasound to examine the heart chambers, valves, and vessels are referred to as cardiac sonographers. They use ultrasound instrumentation to create images called echocardiograms. Cardiovascular technologists and technicians and vascular technologists use imaging technology to help physicians diagnose cardiac (heart) and peripheral vascular (blood vessel) ailments in patients. Certification is not required to enter the occupation in the United States.

  • Track 10-1Cardiac Sonographar
  • Track 10-2Vascular Technologistics
  • Track 10-3EKG Technisions

Cardiac ultrasound is a valuable skill set for medical professionals in multiple clinical scenarios including trauma, hypotension and cardiac arrest.  The proper techniques to image the heart can be mastered with practice and familiarity with the ultrasound machine.  Familiarity with the common echocardiographic “windows” provides a foundation upon which to interrogate these structures and make clinical decisions.  

  • Track 11-1Cardiac ultrasound pregnancy
  • Track 11-2Focused Cardiac Ultrasound in the Emergent Setting
  • Track 11-3Introduction and Principles of Point-of-Care Ultrasound
  • Track 11-4Trauma Ultrasound
  • Track 11-5Abdominal Ultrasound/Procedural Ultrasound

Pediatric echocardiography is mainly used for the detection of congenital heart defects in pediatrics. It is also used for the evaluation of murmurs and is an essential tool to evaluate the effectiveness of medical therapy and surgical treatments disorders or improper functioning of heart. 

  • Track 12-1Alternative diagnostic imaging techniques
  • Track 12-2Doppler methods and their application for assessment of blood flow
  • Track 12-3Common congenital heart defects and surgical interventions
  • Track 12-4Transthoracic echocardiography in pediatric patients

Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE) is an echocardiographic imaging technique that analyses the motion of tissues in the heart by using the naturally occurring speckle pattern in the myocardium or blood when imaged by ultrasonic. This novel method of documentation of myocardial motion represents a non-invasive method of definition of vectors and velocity. When compared to other technologies seeking non-invasive definition of ischemia, speckle tracking seems a valuable endeavour. This speckle pattern is a mixture of interference patterns and natural acoustic reflections. These reflections, also described as ‘‘speckles’’ or ‘‘markers’’.

  • Track 13-1Coronary Artery Disease
  • Track 13-2Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
  • Track 13-3Hypertensive Heart Disease
  • Track 13-4Pericardial Disease/Restrictive Cardiomyopathy

Intra Cardiac Echocardiography (ICE) is an imaging technique that allows physicians to get a clear picture of the inner workings of the heart. A small ultrasound probe is placed into a vein in the groin and then threaded into the area of the heart being worked on. ICE may be used as a diagnostic tool, or for guiding the physician during minimally invasive procedures inside the heart such as stent placement, or for the repair of a hole in the heart such as atrial septal defect. The use of intracardiac echo at UNC makes heart-imaging procedures much easier on the patient. Where previously a probe was inserted into the throat, causing great discomfort for the patient, the ICE procedure is completely painless and involves only the use of a local anesthetic at the site of insertion.

  • Track 14-1Atrial flutter and macroreentrant tachycardia
  • Track 14-2Atrial fibrillation – Pulmonary vein ablation
  • Track 14-3Ventricular arrhythmias
  • Track 14-4Atrial fibrillation – Linar lesions

An echocardiogram is a noninvasive  procedure used to assess the heart's function and structures. An exercise echocardiogram is performed to assess the heart's response to stress or exercise. During the procedure, a transducer sends out ultrasonic sound waves at a frequency too high to be heard. When the transducer is placed on the chest at certain locations and angles, the ultrasonic sound waves move through the skin and other body tissues to the heart tissues, where the waves bounce or "echo" off of the heart structures. The transducer picks up the reflected waves and sends them to a computer. The computer displays the echoes as images of the heart walls and valves.

  • Track 15-1M-mode echocardiography
  • Track 15-2Doppler echocardiography
  • Track 15-3Color Doppler
  • Track 15-42-D (two-dimensional) Echocardiography
  • Track 15-53-D (three-dimensional) Echocardiography

Focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS) refers to the use of ultrasound to evaluate cardiac pathophysiology at the point of care, by providers actively managing a patient. FOCUS differs from both limited and comprehensive echocardiography with respect to the location where it is done, the providers doing the study, the devices used, and, most importantly, the scope of the examination. FOCUS is used in intensive care units and emergency departments to evaluate patients in shock, with dyspnea and chest pain. Anesthesiologists, emergency physicians, intensivists, and a growing number of other providers throughout the healthcare system are using cardiac ultrasound in this directed fashion. 

  • Track 16-1Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma
  • Track 16-2Focused Cardiac Ultrasound
  • Track 16-3Basic Thoracic Ultrasound
  • Track 16-4Aorta Ultrasound
  • Track 17-1Case reports diagnosis by echocardiography
  • Track 17-2Ethics and legal issues in echocardiography
  • Track 17-3Advancements in the echocardiography